Getting the most from a job interview

What do you think of job interviews? A necessary evil? A torturous procedure? Something relatively painless? Some people seem to breeze through them, while for others it’s a case that the more we want a particular job, the more difficult the interview seems!

So how can we frame this process into a positive and valuable experience?

A meeting of equals – how you perceive your status in an interview will affect your performance. If you think that the people you are interviewing for are ‘better’ than you or that you are not yet capable of working at their level, you could undermine yourself.

interview panel

Consider what skills and talents you have and how they set you apart from the other candidates. Remember; if they’re interviewing for a position, they’re looking for the right person. You are helping in the search and if you’re called to meet with them, you’re already ahead of the majority of applicants!

Treat it as an opportunity

Wherever you are in your career, you can see an interview as an opportunity to practice and demonstrate the profession you love. Rather than seeing it as a test, it’s another platform for you to express your skills with a new group of people, even if you don’t get offered the job.

Especially if you are someone who hasn’t yet secured your first full-time post – what a great chance to do the very thing you’ve trained for?

Ask questions – show you’re interested – No two schools are alike

In the Q&A part of the interview, it shouldn’t be a case of you only answering questions. It could be a dialogue – come prepared with specific questions about that particular school. It might be the place where you spend the next chapter of your life, so you want to know it’s the right place for you.

Think about your ‘must haves’ or ‘would likes’ and have two or three clear questions ready. It could be relating to your work schedule, the school’s development planning over the next few years or which particular challenges that school faces. You must be able to show you have thought about the day to day demands of that school.

hand pick

Welcome feedback

Acknowledge that you’re growing – We are always encouraging a growth mindset in our students, but do you treat yourself the same way? No matter how an interview goes, have the courage to ask for feedback – either right there and then or in the days following the result of the interview.

Even if they offer you a job, you can still ask about what strengths or weaknesses they saw; these could become useful talking points at your first performance review. If you are unsuccessful, the feedback can be carried into your next interview as a possible to-do list of improvements so that the next time, you get the job!

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About our Community Expert

 

Paul B

Paul Boyd
Community Expert

Paul is an actor and English teacher from Northern Ireland. Alongside his acting career working in theatre, film and television across the UK, he also teaches in primary and secondary schools throughout London.

Paul provides performance coaching to both individual clients and businesses.

Paul Boyd Community Expert
Paul Boyd Community Expert