Getting the most from a job interview

So how can we frame this process into a positive and valuable experience?

A meeting of equals – how you perceive your status in an interview will affect your performance. If you think that the people you are interviewing for are ‘better’ than you or that you are not yet capable of working at their level, you could undermine yourself.

interview panel

Consider what skills and talents you have and how they set you apart from the other candidates. Remember; if they’re interviewing for a position, they’re looking for the right person. You are helping in the search and if you’re called to meet with them, you’re already ahead of the majority of applicants!

Treat it as an opportunity

Wherever you are in your career, you can see an interview as an opportunity to practice and demonstrate the profession you love. Rather than seeing it as a test, it’s another platform for you to express your skills with a new group of people, even if you don’t get offered the job.

Especially if you are someone who hasn’t yet secured your first full-time post – what a great chance to do the very thing you’ve trained for?

Ask questions – show you’re interested – No two schools are alike

In the Q&A part of the interview, it shouldn’t be a case of you only answering questions. It could be a dialogue – come prepared with specific questions about that particular school. It might be the place where you spend the next chapter of your life, so you want to know it’s the right place for you.

Think about your ‘must haves’ or ‘would likes’ and have two or three clear questions ready. It could be relating to your work schedule, the school’s development planning over the next few years or which particular challenges that school faces. You must be able to show you have thought about the day to day demands of that school.

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Welcome feedback

Acknowledge that you’re growing – We are always encouraging a growth mindset in our students, but do you treat yourself the same way? No matter how an interview goes, have the courage to ask for feedback – either right there and then or in the days following the result of the interview.

Even if they offer you a job, you can still ask about what strengths or weaknesses they saw; these could become useful talking points at your first performance review. If you are unsuccessful, the feedback can be carried into your next interview as a possible to-do list of improvements so that the next time, you get the job!

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About our Community Expert

 

Paul B

Paul Boyd
Community Expert

Paul is an actor and English teacher from Northern Ireland. Alongside his acting career working in theatre, film and television across the UK, he also teaches in primary and secondary schools throughout London.

Paul provides performance coaching to both individual clients and businesses.

The Soft Skills of Leadership

You have worked hard and promotion has come your way. The CPD courses, hours spent reading and the constant seeking of ‘whole school opportunities’ have paid off.

Finally appointed to the leadership position that has eluded you for some time, you will make this work. The vision is in your heart, you picture yourself sharing, collaborating with like-minded people, you will make a difference. It’s your time.

This is a valid picture of the inception of leadership. Full of hope and so it should be, school leadership is the cradle of hope for thousands of young people in our schools across the nation. As a leader, you will be adept in processes that underpin school improvement and strategies that secure effective teaching.

You know how to write an action plan, hold staff to account and engage that elusive parent who never comes to the parents evening unless you practically pay them!

You have successfully completed leadership courses, so let me share with you the soft skills of leadership that are rarely part of any course syllabus, but will influence the success of your leadership journey far more than you realise. The leader who is appointed and thrives in their position is the one who grasps these concepts early.

Robles identifies 10 soft skills needed in leadership and in the workplace generally:

  • Communication
  • Professionalism
  • Courtesy
  • Work ethic
  • Flexibility
  • Teamwork
  • Integrity
  • Responsibility
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Positive attitude

Every school leader would recognise these playing a role in their day, but we underestimate the weight these soft skills have in relation to how our leadership is received by others.

The underestimation may stem from the term ‘soft skills’ itself. Think about the word soft. It’s the obvious contrast to hard—as in the phrases; hard data, hard evidence, and hard thinking. If hard implies objective, clearly defined and reliable: soft must imply subjective, woolly, and unreliable—soft-hearted rather than hard-headed. Soft outcomes are sentimental or ‘warm and fuzzy’. It undermines a claim for serious attention.

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